Second year of positive reports for Young People’s Unit

MAIN Second year of positive reports for Young People’s Unit

The North of Scotland Regional CAMHS Young People’s Inpatient Unit (YPU) welcomed positive reports from the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland and the Royal College of Psychiatry Quality Network for Inpatient CAMHS for the second year running.

The 12-bedded psychiatric service is based at Dudhope Terrace in Dundee and provides access to mental health care and treatment for some of the most vulnerable young people aged between 12 and 18 years old.  The unit serves five of the North of Scotland Health Boards including NHS Tayside, NHS Grampian, NHS Highland, NHS Orkney and NHS Shetland.

The Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland (MWC) published its report following a visit to the unit in July, where they met with patients, families, carers and staff.  This year’s report is extremely positive with no recommendations made.

Young people did not raise any concerns regarding their care and treatment with the only suggestion being in relation to increasing the activities available.  Care planning was noted as being person centred and comprehensive, reflecting the assessed needs of each individual patient, with young people being fully involved in the development of these.

A strong emphasis on engagement and communication with families and carers was commended, particularly the introduction of a new role to the service of a link charge nurse/case manager.  This role was developed to provide dedicated support to a young person’s family during admission and to ensure that families and carers were fully involved in the child’s care.  The person-centred approach to young people being involved in multidisciplinary meetings and reviews was also noted.

The report concluded that it is evident that the service provides a strong emphasis and focus on staff development with staff able to take advantage of training opportunities.  Finally the report commended the partnership working that has been undertaken with Police Scotland and voiced support for the continued development of this working relationship to benefit young people.

MAIN Second year of positive reports for Young People’s Unit (1)The Royal College of Psychiatry Quality Network for Inpatient CAMHS (QNIC) review team highlighted that since their last review there have been a number of positive service developments and also commended the new link charge nurse/case manager role.

Strengths of the unit were noted as: the environment is bright and spacious with space for relaxation and recreation whilst showcasing art work of Scotland’s rural locations as a reminder of home for young people; staffing for the service is managed well, particularly relation to bank staffing induction with all staff having access to development opportunities and strong support systems; and a variety of therapeutic interventions and groups are available for young people with a positive school provision.

The report also highlighted potential future challenges and advice to meet these.  Again as with the MWC report there were no specific recommendations/actions provided within the review.  The potential future challenges noted will now be included within the unit’s local delivery plan and key actions taken forward over the coming months.

As the service has been given above 96% in the review’s criteria scoring, the multidisciplinary team will now be able to work towards national accreditation with the Royal College of Psychiatry early next year.  If successful it will become the first unit in Scotland to achieve this.

CAMHS regional network manager Lesley-Ann McGregor said, “The service has been extremely pleased with this year’s reports as both demonstrate the continued improvements by the multidisciplinary team to improve care and treatment to young people and their families/carers.

“Over the past couple of years the service has focused its efforts on developing person-centred care facilitated by practice development approaches.  This commenced with a cultural diagnostic into the service in partnership between staff, young people and families/carers.  We began our improvement journey by determining our vision and a core set of values to strive towards for both staff and young people.  A collective leadership approach to change was adopted and these reports demonstrate that this is having a positive impact on the staffing group and enabling the wider team to drive forward positive service developments and improvements.

“The improvement journey is still within early stages, however the team highly values these annual service visits to highlight and further support its commitment to making a positive difference to a young person’s life.  Initially the service’s focus was to improve safety and reduce harm through innovation and collaboration between staff, service users, families and carers.  As a result the service has been a leader in patient safety improvements for inpatient CAMHS and is now helping influence the future of patient safety initiatives within NHS Scotland CAMHS.

“It is fantastic that the team has been assessed as being able to undertake the accreditation review next year.  This is testament to the dedication and commitment of the multidisciplinary team and is a great achievement by all staff.”

Visits by the Mental Welfare Commission (announced or unannounced) are to ensure the UK meets the requirements of UN treaties in relation to the detention of people under the mental health legislation and to prevent any ill treatment.  During these visits individual care is assessed to determine whether care, treatment and support is in line with the law and good practice.

Annual visits by the Royal College of Psychiatry QNIC review the quality of service that inpatient units provide and help staff to plan improvements for the future in a supportive quality improvement network emphasising on facilitating change.  Young people, families, carers and staff are also interviewed as part of this process.

MAIN Second year of positive reports for Young People’s Unit (2)

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